Frizell and Nedow strike medal for Canada at CWG

Sultana Frizell by Claus Andersen

Sultana Frizell by Claus Andersen

Sultana Frizell golden again at Commonwealth Games; Tim Nedow wins Bronze

 

Veuillez cliquer ici pour la version française

Glasgow, SCO - The Canadian track and field team won two medals within about 30-minutes of time on the second day of competition at the 2014 Commonwealth Games. Both medals were won in throwing events, Sultana Frizell of Perth, Ont., won gold in the hammer and Tim Nedow of Brockville, Ont., took bronze in the shot put.

Sultana Frizell defender her 2010 title in the women’s hammer throw registering 71.97-metres, her third time establishing a new Commonwealth Games Record at the 2014 event. “I would have liked to throw further but I got the gold and a games record and I am completely thrilled with that,” comments Sultana. “It was a lot of fun with the crowd and a great atmosphere to compete in.”

Tim Nedow photo by Claus Andersen

Tim Nedow
photo by Claus Andersen

In the men’s shot put Tim Nedow won the bronze medal with 20.59-metres. “It was a great competition, by far the best we have had (at a Commonwealth Games),” comments Tim. “I mean two guys breaking the Commonwealth Games record just shows how stacked it was. With me coming in I knew I had a chance to potentially get a medal but I also know if I want to win it, it would take 21-metres which would have been a personal best. I wanted a personal best but you know, I had three throws over 20-metres.” Justin Rodhe of Kamloops, B.C., was unable to register a mark.

Khamica Bingham by Claus Andersen

Khamica Bingham by Claus Andersen

In the women’s 100-metres final Khamica Bingham of Brampton, Ont., finished seventh in 11.37 seconds. “It is kind of mixed emotions, I feel like I didn’t have the greatest start,” notes Khamica. “It is a bit more difficult to run in lane 1 because you can’t see anybody. I just tried to go out hard and then just keep running. I felt that I was tightening up a little bit trying to relax and then I just came out seventh. I was happy to make the final, that was my goal but I really wanted to do more in the final.”

Earlier in the day in the women’s 100-metres semi final Khamica qualified to the final with a time of 11.32 seconds. Crystal Emmanuel of East York, Ont., was just out of the top eight clocking in 11.43 seconds. Shai-Anne Davis of Toronto, Ont., clocked 11.52 seconds.

In the men’s 100-metres both Aaron Brown and Dontae Richards-Kwok of Toronto, Ont., did not advance to the finals. Aaron finished his semi final in fifht in 10.17 and Dontae ran 10.42 in his semi final.

Audrey Jean Baptiste  photo by Claus Andersen

Audrey Jean Baptiste
photo
by Claus Andersen

Audrey Jean-Baptiste of Montreal, Que., raced the one-lap 400-metres in 53.61 seconds, it was not enough to advance to the final.

Damian Warner  photo by Claus Andersen

Damian Warner
photo by Claus Andersen

Damian Warner leads decathlon

After the first day of competition in the decathlon Damian Warner of London, Ont., sits in first place with 4378 points. Damian opened the day clocking a personal best and Commonwealth Games record in the decathlon 100-metres with 10.29 seconds. In the long jump he registered 7.50-metres, in the shot put 14.04-metres, in the high jump 1.96-metres and clocked 47.78 seconds in the last event of the day, the 400-metres.

“I’m pleased with everything except for high jump, I would have liked to get around the 2.05-metres range but I guess I will have to settle with 1.96 and make up the points in other places”, notes Damian. “High jump wasn’t the greatest but I had to tell myself to come out and run a hard 400-metres, I did that close to a personal best in a decathlon so that’s a good result.” Damian adds, “The 100-metres was good, about halfway through I thought ‘please say .29 because I wanted to dip under 10.30 (seconds).”

Everyone advances from morning session

Jim Steacy of Lethbridge, Alta., automatically qualified for the hammer throw final with a toss of 70.62-metres on his first attempt, the final takes place tomorrow.

Duandre Barnaby  photo by Claus Andersen

Duandre Barnaby
photo by Claus Andersen

In the men’s 400-metres all three Canadians advanced into tomorrow’s semi-finals. Daundre Barnaby of Brampton, Ont., ran 46.16, Philip Osei of Toronto, Ont., clocked 47.11 and Michael Robertson of Williamstown, Ont., ran 46.87.

Derek Drouin of Corunna, Ont., and Michael Mason of Nanoose Bay, B.C., qualified into the high jump final with clearances over 2.20-metres, the final takes place Wednesday.

Kate Van Buskirk  photo by Claus Andersen

Kate Van Buskirk
photo by Claus Andersen

Nicole Sifuentes of Winnipeg, Man., and Kate Van Buskirk of Toronto, Ont., advanced to the 1500-metres final. Kate placed second in her heat for the automatic qualification with 4:07.74, Nicole advanced with a time of 4:06.61. The 1500-metres final is tomorrow.

Canadians in action on Tuesday

The heptathlon gets underway tomorrow with two Canadians, Brianne Theisen-Eaton of Humboldt, Sask., and Jessica Zelinka of London, Ont.

The T54 wheelchair 1500-metres heats will feature Diane Roy of Sherbrooke, Que., in the women’s race and Josh Cassidy of Ottawa, Ont., and Alex Dupont of Clarenceville, Que.

Opening in the 400-metres hurdles is Chanice Taylor-Chase of Ajax, Ont., and Noelle Montcalm of Belle River, Ont.

Brandon McBride of Windsor, Ont., enters action in the men’s 800-metres.

For more on athletics at the Commonwealth Games click here.

-AC-

Emily Hooper
Coordinator, Marketing and Communications, Athletics Canada
Media Attaché, Commonwealth Games Canada
ehooper@athletics.ca
07913595980

1954 British Empire and Commonwealth Games revisited 60 years later

10067635

Former middle distance runner Doug Clement, 81, on the track at Brockton Oval in Vancouver. Clement, who used to train at the old track, went on to become a doctor, specializing in sport medicine.

Photograph by: Mark van Manen, Vancouver Sun

Doug Clement

4 x 440-yards relay — silver medal 1954 British Empire and Commonwealth Games

Aug. 7, 1954 still stands as the single most-significant track and field day ever experienced by Doug Clement.

That’s a remarkable statement, given the thousands of track meets he has witnessed since.

Barely 21 at the time, Clement saw Roger Bannister defeat John Landy in the much-anticipated Miracle Mile before watching British marathoner Jim Peters famously collapse on Empire Stadium’s track before he could finish the race.

Then Clement stepped onto the track himself and captured a silver medal as part of Canada’s 4 x 440-yards relay team.

A memorable day indeed.

“The drama of Jim Peters alone was unbelievable,” said Clement, now a fit 81-year-old “retired” doctor who remains very active in B.C.’s track and field community along with his wife Diane, a former world-class athlete herself.

He won a track scholarship at the University of Oregon and competed in two Olympics and two Commonwealth Games, but Clement describes himself as a “journeyman” athlete who felt like a hero in Vancouver 60 years ago.

“Suddenly you were recognized and accepted as being something big, right in your hometown,” he said.

Clement, who was born in Montreal and raised in Vancouver, compares the atmosphere surrounding the British Empire and Commonwealth Games with the positive vibe that accompanied the 2010 Olympics in Vancouver.

“If there was any infighting about holding the Games, it disappeared once the actual event started,” he said. “Vancouver was introduced to the world and the world was introduced to Vancouver.”

Clement feels the 1954 Games helped the city evolve from its former status as a quiet provincial community with a distinct bias toward all things British.

“At the time, Vancouver was really a logging and fishing town, and when loggers came into the city for the weekend, it was a zoo downtown,” he said. “I think the Games brought us into a new era, and I don’t know if it’s recognized by the public that way because there are very few of us (Games participants) around now.”

 1958Dougstart copy

Video

http://www.vancouversun.com/sports/athletes+competed+1954+Empire+Games/10067632/story.html#ixzz38mgd3faT

Lanni Marchant 4th, Mohammed Ahmed 5th on opening day of athletics at Commonwealth Games

Lanni Marchant photo by Claus Anderson

Lanni Marchant
photo by Claus Andersen

 

Veuillez cliquer ici pour voir la version française

 

Glasgow, SCO - Athletics (track and field) started today at the 2014 Commonwealth Games with the Canadian team recording a pair of top eight finishes, a new Commonwealth Games record, a new personal best and nine athletes qualifying to further rounds.

Opening athletics competition today was the women’s marathon where Lanni Marchant of London, Ont., fought hard for a fourth place finish in 2 hours 31 minutes and 14 seconds. Lanni, who was aiming for a top five finish, started to cramp near the end but did everything she could to end strong. “I’m feeling alright, I am pretty happy with it”, comments Lanni. “I was trying to catch them but around 37-kilometres my calf started to cramp on me a little so I had to make sure to run smart so I didn’t completely cramp up. When the Aussie caught me I figured my medal contention might be up but I ended up catching fourth place.”

Mo Ahmed  photo by Claus Anderson

Mo Ahmed
photo by Claus Andersen

In the evening session Mohammed Ahmed of St. Catharines, Ont., raced to a fifth place finish at Hampden Park in the men’s 5000-metres. Mohammed crossed the line in a new personal best of 13:18.88, 10-seconds faster than his previous personal best. “I am a bit disappointed, I really wanted to go out there and be right there with those guys but you know I am a bit closer than I was last year. I have another race coming up on Friday and another Canadian there with me which will make it a little bit easier, so I am just going to go out there and have fun.” Mohammed adds, “It was a PB (personal best) today so you can’t be too disappointed with a 10 second improvement, I am not disappointed with the time just those two errors I wish I could take back and get a medal.”

In women’s hammer throw qualification Sultana Frizell of Perth, Ont., got right down to business. On her first throw Sultana reached 68.92-metres, a new Commonwealth Games record, and the throw secured her a spot in tomorrow’s final.

Five athletes advanced to the semi-finals of the 100-metres, which take place tomorrow. In the men’s sprint Aaron Brown of Toronto, Ont., and Dontae Richards-Kwok of Mississauga, Ont., clocked 10.39 and 10.36 respectively to advance. Jared Connaughton of New Haven, P.E.I., was third in his heat in 10.47 and did not advance. In the women’s sprint race all three Canadians automatically advanced; Khamica Bingham of Caledon, Ont., (11.44), Shai-Anne Davis of Richmond, B.C., (11.72) and Crystal Emmanuel of East York, Ont., (11.64).

Tim Nedow of Brockville, Ont., and Justin Rodhe of Kamloops, B.C., advanced to tomorrow’s shot put final. Tim registered a best throw of 19.84-metres and Justin registered a best throw of 19.14-metres in qualification.

Audrey Jean-Baptiste of Montreal, Que., advances to the women’s 400-metres semi-finals registering 54.15 seconds in her heat. Fawn Dorr of Marten River, Ont., did not advance (55.33 seconds).

Other Canadians in Action on Day 2

  • The decathlon gets underway with Damian Warner of London, Ont., in the 100-metres, long jump, shot put, high jump and 400-metres
  • Derek Drouin of Corunna, Ont., and Michael Mason of Nanoose Bay, B.C., in men’s high jump qualification
  • The men’s 400-metres rounds will include Daundre Barnaby of Brampton, Ont., Philip Osei of Toronto, Ont., and Michael Robertson of Williamstown, Ont.
  • Jim Steacy of Lethbridge, Alta., in the men’s hammer throw
  • Nicole Sifuentes of Winnipeg, Man., and Kate Van Buskirk of Toronto, Ont., in the women’s 1500-metres

For more on the athletics team at the Commonwealth Games click here.

-AC-

Emily Hooper
Coordinator, Marketing and Communications, Athletics Canada
Media Attaché, Commonwealth Games Canada
ehooper@athletics.ca
07913595980

Canada’s medal prospects in track and field at Glasgow’s Commonwealth Games

460856836

Canada enters the Commonwealth Games in Glasgow Scotland with almost a dozen athletes capable of winning medals in the track and field competition.  Naturally injury and with drawl for any reason by Canadian athletes or other competitors can immediately upset any prediction of outcome.  This uncertainty makes sport such a dramatic event and draws the attention of track and field fans around the world.

You will note that Canada’s top prospects are heavily weighted in the technical events.  The strength of the East Africans in the middle distance and distance events and the Jamaican and other Caribbean athletes in the sprints provide Olympic level competition on the track.

Besides Canada’s first dozen athletes who are ranked in the top 3 positions, there is a number on the bubble.  These athletes are ranked based on current times and their careers in the 4th through 6th positions.  We predict that some of the first group of athletes may not convert their top ranking to medals while some athletes on the bubble will actually move up to a medal position.

Can we reach our 2010 medal count of 7 gold, 2 silver and 8 bronze medals in New Delhi?  I think this may be difficult but not impossible.  Here is a run down of our top prospects.

Potential medalists 

Shawn Barber

Shawn Barber

Shawn Barber’94

Toronto born, Canadian record holder 5.71m pole vault

Best outdoor this season of 5.65m

Will be junior at University of Akron this fall

NCAA indoor champion 2014 with Canadian indoor record at 5.75m

Ranked behind veteran Steven Lewis of England with outdoor best in 2014 of 5.70m

Derek Drouin

Derek Drouin

Photo by Maxim Shemetov/Reuters/Files)

Derek Drouin’90

Corunna, Ontario, Canadian record holder 2.40m high jump

Graduate of Indiana University

Bronze medal at 2012 Olympics and 2013 World Championships

Canada’s best bet for gold,

Derek jumps10cm higher than opponents

Sultana Frizell

Sultana Frizell

Photo by Mark Dadswell/Getty Images AsiaPac)

Sultana Frizell’84

Perth, Ontario, Canadian record holder 75.73 hammer

Graduate of University of Georgia

Sultana faces challenge from Sophie Hutchon (71.53m) of England and Julia Ratcliffe (70.28m) of New Zealand but the Canadian has not thrown less than 73.21m in 2014

Defending CWG gold medalist, look for another gold this time

Julie Labonte

Julie Labonte

Photo by Claus Andersen

Julie Labonte’90

Ste. Justine, Quebec, Canadian record holder 18.31m shot put

Graduate of Arizona State University, 2014 best of 17.24m

Gold and Silver out of reach with Valerie Adams (20.46m) of New Zealand the double Olympic Champion and Cleopatra Borel (19.10m) of Trinidad

Julie will struggle with Annie Alexander (17.10m) of Trinidad for bronze

Tim Nedow

Tim Nedow

Photo by FRANCK FIFE/AFP/Getty Images

Tim Nedow’90

Brockville, Ontario Canadian champion 2014 shot put

Graduate of DePaul University, 2014 personal best of 20.98m

Many concede the gold and silver spots to Tom Walsh (21.23m) of New Zealand

and O’Dayne Richards (21.11m) of Jamaica

Tim will need to fight off challenge of Jacko Gill (20.70m) of New Zealand for bronze

Christabel Nettey

Christabel Nettey

Christabel Nettey’91

Surrey, BC Canadian Champion 2014 long jump

Graduate of Arizona State University, 2014 best of 6.73m

Blessing Okagbare (6.86m) of Nigeria and Shara Proctor (6.82m) of England

may take gold and silver and Christabel left to contend with Brooke Stratton (6.70m) of Australia for the bronze

Alysha Newman

Alysha Newman

Photo by Stu Forster/Getty Images Europe

Alysha Newman’94

Delaware, Ontario Canadian Junior record holder pole vault

University of Miami junior year 2014 best of 4.41m

Favourite is Alana Boyd (4.65m) of Australia and teammate Liz Parnov (4.40m) may take top two spots and Alysha will face challenges form Sally Peake (4.40m) of England for bronze

James Steacy photo THE CANADIAN PRESS/Ryan Remiorz

James Steacy
photo THE CANADIAN PRESS/Ryan Remiorz

James Steacy’84

Lethbridge, Alberta, Canadian record holder 79.13m hammer throw

Graduate of University of Lethbridge, 2014 best of 75.27m

Pan American Champion for Canada, James will fight for gold against England’s duo of Nick Millar (74.38m) and Alec Smith (73.52m)

Brianne Theisen-Eaton

Brianne Theisen-Eaton

Brianne Theisen- Eaton’88

Humboldt, Saskatchewan, Canadian record holder 6641 points heptathlon

University of Oregon graduate, silver medalist at World Indoor and Outdoor Championships.

The with drawl of Katarina Johnson-Thompson (6682) of England due to injury leaves only teammate, Jessica Zelinka (6128) and Morgan Lake (6081) of England as opposition.  Brianne should take the gold in this event

Damian Warner with Ashton Eaton on right

Damian Warner with Ashton Eaton on right

Damian Warner’89

London, Ontario,

Bronze medal World Championships, Moscow in 2013 with 8512 points decathlon

In 2014 Damian had a 7th place finish in World Indoor Championships in the heptathlon.   At the Canadian Championships he ran a personal best in the 110m hurdles with 13.52 (0.9) in the heats and then won the final in 13.62 (-1.7).  He completed only four events at Decathlon in Ottawa last weekend. One hopes this was scheduled as a part of his training program and not an injury.  If healthy he should have a strong competition against South Africa’s Willem Coertzen (8199) and Ashley Bryant (8144) of England.

Angela Whyte

Angela Whyte

Photo by Ian Walton/Getty Images Europe

Angela Whyte’80

Edmonton, Alberta Pan American silver medalist 100m Hurdles

Graduate of University of Idaho, 2014 best 12.89

Sally Pearson (12.59) of Australia is the Olympic Champion and Tiffany Porter (12.65) of England the bronze medalist from the last World Championships seem to have a lock on the top spots. Angela will have to beat Jamaicans, Monique Morgan (12.94) and Shermaine Williams (12.95) to get the bronze

Jessica Zelinka

Jessica Zelinka

Photo credit: Frank Gunn/The Canadian Press

Jessica Zelinka’81

London, Ontario, Pan American Champion Heptathlon

Graduate of University of Calgary, 2014 best 6128 points

Jessica should have a strong run at the silver medal with 17 year old Morgan Lake (6081) of England just having competed in World Junior Championships in Eugene this week. Could Angela Whyte medal in this event as she has a 2014 best of 6018 points?

 

On the bubble

Melissa Bishop

Melissa Bishop

photo by Claus Andersen

Melissa Bishop’88

Eganville, Ontario, Canadian Champion 800m

University of Windsor Graduate, 2014 best 1:59.70

Melissa faces World Champions, Eunice Sum (1:57.92) and Janeth Jepkosgei (1:58.70) of Kenya who have every reason to be one two in this race.  Newcomer, Winnie Nanyando of Uganda just set a new national record of 1:58.63 and Scotland’s Lynsey Sharp (1:59.67) and England’s Jessica Judd (1:59.77) will make this a very close race for the bronze

Aaron Brown

Aaron Brown

Photo by Claus Andersen

Aaron Brown’92

Toronto, Ontario Canadian record holder 20.16 200m

Graduate of University of Southern California

Faces Jamaica’s Warren Weir (19.82) the Olympic and World Championship medalist plus his teammate, Nickel Ashmeade (19.95).  Isaac Makwala of Botswana just a new national record of 19.96.  Jamaica’s Rasheed Dywer (20.04) and Antoine Adams (20.08) of St Kitts will make this a very hot battle for these medals.

Aaron is on the verge of dipping under the 20 second barrier and he did upset Weir in Edmonton in June.

Liz Gleadle

Liz Gleadle

Photo by Reese Raybon

Liz Gleadle’88

Vancouver, BC   Canadian record holder javelin 64.50m

Graduate of University of British Columbia

Liz faces Australians, Kimberly Mickele (66.83m) World Championships silver medalist and Kathryn Mitchell (66.10m) plus South Africa’s World Championship bronze medalist, Sunette Viljoen (64.87).  This competition will be an uphill battle for our Liz Gleadle

Matt Hughes

Matt Hughes

Photo by Mark Kolbe/Getty Images Europe

Matt Hughes’89

Oshawa, Ontario, Canadian record holder 8:11.64 3000m steeplechase

Graduate University of Louisville, 2014 best 8:12.81

The Kenyan wall of terror is mounted in front of Matt.

Jairius Birech (8:02.37), Ezekial Kemboi (8:04.12) and Brimin Kipruto (8:04.64) or 4 others faster than Matt could be on the start line. Can he take down one of them for the bronze?

Canada's 400m relay team photo YURI KADOBNOV/AFP/Getty Images)

Canada’s 400m relay team
photo YURI KADOBNOV/AFP/Getty Images)

4x100m men

Canada took the bronze medal at the World Championships in Moscow

last year with a time of 37.92. Jamaica seems a guaranteed gold in this event with Usain Bolt scheduled to anchor this event. Britain has a 37.93 and Trinidad 38.03 at the World Relays Championships while Canada managed only 38.55.  No gifts here for Canada’s relay pool of Dontae Richards-Kwok, Gavin Smellie, Aaron Brown, Jared Connaughton, Segun Makinde and Andre De Grasse but a medal of any colour would be great.

Cam Levins

Cam Levins

Cam Levins’89

Black Creek, British Columbia, Canadian Champion 2014 5000m

Graduate of Southern Utah University 2014 best 27:36.00

Kenyan depth provides huge challenge for Cam who will run only the 10.000m. Selection of Kenyans teams at altitude confuses situation as Josephat Bett and Peter Kirui has seasonal best of 28:06.3 but in Nairobi.

Lanni Marchant

Lanni Marchant

Lanni Marchant’84

London, Ontario, Canadian record holder marathon 2:28.00

Once again Kenyan prowess puts Filomena Cheyech (2:22.44) and Phyllis Ongori (2:23.22) out front.  The battle for bronze is open as Namibia’s Helaria Johannes (2:28.27) and Agnes Barsosio (2:30.37) of Kenya can be challenged by Lanni’s 2014 time of 2:30.34

Mike Mason

Mike Mason

Mike Mason’86

Abbotsford, British Columbia, personal best 2.31m High Jump

2014 best of 2.28m

With teammate, Derek Drouin favored for gold, Mike will be in battle with Tom Parsons (2.29m) of England, Kabelo Kgosiemang (2.28m) of Botswana, Temfack Fernan Djoumessi (2.28m) of the Cameroons and Ryan Ingraham (2.28m) of England for a spot on the podium

oconnell

Photo by Michael Scott

Jessica O’Connell’89

Calgary, Alberta, Canadian Champion 5000m

2014 best 15:13.21

Double trouble with both Kenyans and England.  Mercy Cherono (14:39.49), Janet Kisa (14:59.93) and Margaret Wangari Muriuki (15:30.18) plus Brits, Jo Pavey (15.04.87), Emelia Gorecka (15:07.45) and Julia Bleasdale (15:11.68) will make a great race for Jessica.

Nicole Sifuentes

Nicole Sifuentes

Nicole Sifuentes’86

Winnipeg, Manitoba World Indoor bronze medalist 1500m

2014 best 4:04.87

Again the Kenyans and Brits produce big challenges here. Helen Obiri (3:57.05) is world indoor medalist and teammate Faith Kipyegon (3:58.01) is world junior champion. Laura Muir (4:00.07) of England and Laura Weightman (4:02.72) make this a tight race for Nicole

Kara’s Experience at the Harry Jerome Track Classic

Kara Patterson    photo by Reese Raybon

Kara Patterson photo by Reese Raybon

The next meet on my schedule was the Vancouver Sun HarryJerome International Track Classic.

I competed at this Vancouver, B.C. meet in 2010 and loved the trip, because my Canadian family came, I threw well, and I got to spend time with Russell!  This time around was no less wonderful, as my Mom drove up from home home, I got to catch up with my long-lost friend Melinda, and the meet has grown into something really great for athletes and spectators alike.  It’s small enough so that you can keep track of everything from the stands and they take really good care of the athletes they bring in!

I consider Vancouver successful for a completely different reason than I was happy with Lausanne.

I was almost over my cold, but my quads were insanely sore for no reason.  I had done the same squat workout I’ve done for this entire block on that Monday, and by Thursday, especially my right leg was still super tight.  No idea what happened.  Sometimes there isn’t an answer!  So I didn’t really know what to expect out of the competition.  I took way too many warm-up throws, trying to feel positions that my body was resisting getting into.  So when the meet started, I was already tired.

My prelims were bad.  I threw terribly enough times in 2011 to know that it happens, and I like to think that I learned not to freak out about it that year-that any competition can be saved by just one throw.  My first four attempts in Vancouver were really pushy with my right leg, fairly slow, and very forward, with no discipline to keep my right arm back at all.  I can’t understand how our bodies like to do the exact opposite of what we know will be good for them when they’re hurting!  Since my right quad was so sore, it should have been easy for it to shut down and not push me forward into my block, but nooooooo.  It pushed and it pushed and it pushed, and it blew my chest down.

I talked to Wendy after Lausanne about conserving my energy throughout a competition, as like I said, I’d gotten tired there.  Before my fifth round in Vancouver, I laid down in a sunny spot in the grass and was just quiet, so I could focus on positions and get pumped to hit them.  All I wanted to do is what Ty told me to before this meet: Attack the last three steps, stay back and tall, and then explode through the release.  Before that round I had done my habitual sprint about six people before my turn, some high knees, etc. between every throw.  That’s routine, but not necessary, and certainly could sap my energy.  Before rounds 5 and 6, I decided to forego my habits and just trust myself.  Because of my leg soreness and continued recovery from sickness, I also felt pretty slow out of the back of my (admittedly short) full approach, so I added an extra little jogging carry step to bring more speed.

Round 5 was mid-59 meters, because I managed to keep my arm high and stay tall through my chest, kind of.  Round 5 was not enough to take the lead, so I went back to the grass to repeat what had just worked.  Round 6 saw me bring more energy to those last three steps and keep my arm back even longer, allowing 61.56m to take the lead and keep it!

61.56 meters is exactly my 2008 PR, and I love that memory.  61.56 meters is also exactly 2 centimeters short of the meet record I set at Harry Jerome in 2010, so that’s a bummer, but since Harry Jerome is now part of the Canadian National Track League and it wasn’t in 2010, 61.56m is now an NTL record.  Fun.

Miracle Mile Relived at Jerome Track Classic 60 years later.

Nate Brannen targets fellow Canadian Charles Philibert-Thibou on his way to a victory in the men's mile run. Both managed to run sub-four minute mile times.  photo by Jeff Bell

Nate Brannen targets fellow Canadian Charles Philibert-Thibou on his way to a victory in the men’s mile run. Both managed to run sub-four minute mile times. photo by Jeff Bell

Athletes cherish chance to relive Miracle Mile

BURNABY, B.C. – Roger Bannister and John Landy were nowhere to be seen at a small Vancouver-area stadium this week, but they still managed to generate plenty of excitement about an event that is rarely run anymore.

Runners from Canada, the United States, Mexico and Australia cherished the chance to compete in a rare one-mile race Thursday night as the Harry Jerome International Track Classic celebrated the 60th anniversary of the 1954 Miracle Mile.

Miracle Mile NG LOGO April revised copy 6

On Aug. 7, 1954 in the British Empire (now Commonwealth) Games at Vancouver’s since-demolished Empire Stadium, Britain’s Bannister and Australia’s Landy became the first two runners to run a mile in under four minutes. Now at Burnaby’s Swangard Stadium the goal was the same: to break the four-minute mark.

Yet, despite advancements in fitness, training and technology intended to gain as many competitive advantages as possible, only three runners — two Canadians and an American — managed to duplicate Bannister and Landy’s feat.

Nate Brannen, a 31-year-old Cambridge, Ont., native who now lives and trains in Dublin, Ohio, crossed the finish line first in three minutes 57.48 seconds. Charles Philibert-Tiboutot, 23, of Quebec City finished second in 3:57.85, while Chris Derrick of the U.S., took third in 3:59.92.

Brannen has accomplished the sub-four-minute feat before in faster times. But he considered Thursday, along with the festive celebration of history on a beautiful night featuring a clear blue sky and slightly cool conditions that runners love, to be an accomplishment.

“It’s awesome,” said Brannen. “It’s not too often that people see a sub-four-minute mile. Probably 99 per cent of the people here have never seen one. It was a barrier that was broken a long time ago, but everyone always looks at it as a special thing.”

While Brannen was motivated by the chance to make some unforgettable moments, he also had an extra incentive — money. He earned $6,000 for placing first and, with his wife Theresa eight months pregnant, knew beforehand where the money would go.

“We’re going to use it to pay the medical bills,” he said. “(Health) insurance is different in the U.S.”

Brannen could have earned a $4,000 bonus if he had finished in under 3:56.00, considered as today’s standard for a miraculous mile. However, considering the baby on the way, he focused on securing at least $6,000.

“(The money) was the main goal,” said Brannen, whose best showing in a mile is 3:52 and change. “Ten grand would have been nice, but I’m not losing 10 grand for $3,000 (the second-place prize.) So worst case (scenario): Go for the win; miss out on the (bonus) money.”

Brannen indicated he had no choice to do so because the pace was inadequate. The race had a pacesetter or “rabbit” who held a wide lead from the outset, because nobody challenged him before he dropped out halfway through the contest.

“It was way too slow,” said Brannen. “Everyone knows my style. I’ll be there at the end. I’m going to kick hard. So if you’re going to beat me, you better go.”

Instead, the field remained tightly packed for most of the race with arms and legs churning and lifting almost in unison.

Brannen over takes Philibert-Thiboutot with devastating kick    photo by Brian Cliff

Brannen over takes Philibert-Thiboutot with devastating kick photo by Brian Cliff

Like Bannister in 1954, Brannen came from behind and overtook the leader, with Philibert-Tiboutot playing the role of Landy.

“We started to go and I pushed it even more,” said Philibert-Tiboutot. “Then I could feel (Brannen) right on my shoulder, and he wanted to go (out front). I tried to hold him off, but I think he has more years than I do in a race like this. I’m just really happy that I could get under a four-minute mile (for the first time.)”

The Miracle Mile anniversary was Philibert-Tiboutot’s first outdoor one-mile race and only his second all-time after competing at an indoor version. Like Brannen and most others in the race, Philibert-Tiboutot specializes in the 1,500 metres.

“I’m from Quebec,” said Philibert-Tiboutot. “The mile, for most Quebeckers, doesn’t work. It’s metres and only metres in Quebec. That’s why I’ve never been too much into running the mile. But then, this year, with the 60th anniversary, (organizers) made lots of publicity around it, and I thought it would be a great time to do it. I knew I could showcase a sub-4:00 mile. The event was well (publicized) and I knew that everybody would have their eyes on this single race.”

He also cherished the chance to compete before a larger-than-usual audience.

Charles Philibert-Thiboutot appreciates crowd   photo by  Rita Ivanauskas

Charles Philibert-Thiboutot appreciates crowd photo by
Rita Ivanauskas

“Our sport needs more crowds like this,” he said. “I don’t know if you could call it good sportsmanship or bad sportsmanship, but I was just happy to go in front of the crowd waving and feel like they appreciated the show, a showcased event like the event we had.”

Fans and organizers watched the final lap anxiously, and buzzed louder and louder as the seconds on the clock tipped upward before erupting with a loud cheer as the first three broke the four-minute barrier.

Nate and Charles celebrated with crowd   photo by Rita Ivanauskas

Nate and Charles celebrated with crowd photo by Rita Ivanauskas

“I was worried with (less than a minute) to go, because I had said publicly, many times, that we were going to have a sub-four-minute mile,” said meet organizer Doug Clement, who spearheaded the Miracle anniversary. “Fortunately, the athletes put in an under-56-second last lap to get 3:57.00. So it was a success.”

Bannister and Landy, who have been dealing with health issues, were invited to the anniversary but, according to Clement, felt the travel from their homelands would not be advisable.

Clement, 81, who witnessed the Miracle Mile in person, said the anniversary event was actually more competitive than the original race, but the prize money deterred better times.

“I think the women’s mile was actually even a better race,” he said.

Sarah Brown and Kate Van Buskirk produce #1 and #2 world leading marks in the mile  photo by Jeff Bell

Sarah Brown and Kate Van Buskirk produce #1 and #2 world leading marks in the mile photo by Jeff Bell

Sarah Brown of the U.S., won the women’s mile with a time of 4:26.67, beating the 4:27.00 barrier that is considered the benchmark for female milers. Toronto’s Kate Van Buskirk placed second (4:28.08) while American Lauren Paquette was third (4:30.73).

Brown prefers the slightly shorter 1,500 metres. But she was thrilled to record her best-ever time for a mile, while taking part in the anniversary of the men’s event in a season with no Olympics or world championships scheduled.

“It has such a rich history that, I think, it’s exciting in an off-year like this to be able to run in it,” she said.

With the Jerome crowd, the best in a decade at 3,200 according to Clement, and a movement in the U.S. to run the mile more often, possibly for bigger prize money, the question now is whether it will be held more often in Canada. Clement predicted that the push for Canadian mile events will generate mixed results.

Brannen does not want the one-mile event to become commonplace here any time soon.

“In Canada, this is the only mile this year,” he said. “But I like having not as many miles in Canada. If every (meet had) a mile, it wouldn’t be as significant. Running it a couple times (per year) keeps that magic around it.”

By Monte Stewart, The Canadian Press

Jerome Classic results at 1500m mark of mile races

2014 Harry Jerome Track Classic

July 10, 2014 Burnaby

Results of Mile timed at 1500m

Nate Brannen targets fellow Canadian Charles Philibert-Thibou on his way to a victory in the men's mile run. Both managed to run sub-four minute mile times.  photo by Jeff Bell

Nate Brannen targets fellow Canadian Charles Philibert-Thibou on his way to a victory in the men’s mile run. Both managed to run sub-four minute mile times. photo by Jeff Bell

Northern Gateway Invitational Men 1500 Meters

1 Charles Philibert- 90 Canada 3:42.67

2 Nate Brannen 82 Canada 3:42.72

3 Chris Derrick 90 United States 3:44.03

4 Jack Stapleton 96 Australia 3:44.48

5 Colby Alexander 91 United States 3:44.56

6 Eric Avila United States 3:44.86

7 AJ Acosta 88 United States 3:44.97

8 Luc Bruchet 91 Canada 3:45.67

9 Dan Gorman 88 Canada 3:45.75

10 Jose Juan Esparza 90 Mexico 3:46.63

11 Nick Falk 91 Canada 3:46.68

12 Justin Kent 92 Canada 3:46.79

13  Keffri Neal 93 Canada 3:52.27

Sarah Brown and Kate Van Buskirk produce #1 and #2 world leading marks in the mile  photo by Jeff Bell

Sarah Brown and Kate Van Buskirk produce #1 and #2 world leading marks in the mile photo by Jeff Bell

Northern Gateway Invitational Women 1500 Meters

1  Sarah Brown 86 United States 4:08.54

2 Kate Van Buskirk 87 Canada 4:09.51

3  Jessica O’Connell 89 Canada 4:13.09

4 Lauren Paquette 86 United States 4:13.39

5 Angela Bizzarri 88 United States 4:14.15

6 Shelby Houlihan 93 United States 4:14.41

7 Jessica Tebo 88 United States 4:14.98

8 Carise Thompson Canada 4:16.60

9 Rachel Cliff Canada 4:22.48

10 Stephanie Aldea Canada 4:24.15

11 Kerri Gallagher 89 United States 4:26.61

12 Laura Carlyle United States 4:31.09

National 1500m photo by Brian Cliff

National 1500m
photo by Brian Cliff

TIMEX Men National 1500 Meters

1 Dan Quigley 89 United States 3:45.83

2 Zak Patterson 95 Australia 3:45.90

3 Craig Huffer Australia 3:46.14

4 Nigel Hole 89 Canada 3:46.57

5 Jesus Arturo Esparza Mexico 3:47.31

6 Ryan Brockerville 89 Canada 3:47.41

7 Morgan McDonald 96 Australia 3:47.89

8 Aric Van Halen 89 United States 3:48.44

9 Peter Corrigan 89 Canada 3:48.77

10 Karl Roberston 91 Canada 3:51.50

Rosa Flanagan of New Zealand leads world junior list in the mile  photo by Brian Cliff

Rosa Flanagan of New Zealand leads world junior list in the mile photo by Brian Cliff

TIMEX Women National 1500 Meters

1 Rosa Flanagan New Zealand 4:19.06

2 Sarah Inglis 91 Great Britain 4:23.03

3 Jessica Hull 96 Australia 4:23.19

4 Anna Laman 95 Australia 4:24.08

5 Courtney Powell 95 Australia 4:24.55

6 Madeleine Sumner 98 Canada 4:34.44

6 Kate Spencer 95 Australia 4:34.44

8 Nicole Hutchinson 97 Canada 4:38.43

9 Stella Radford 95 Australia 4:39.70

10 Grace Thompson 97 Canada 4:40.25

11 Maddy MacDonald 94 Canada 4:46.11

12 Emma Balazs 95 Canada 4:46.64

13 Ally Ginther Canada 4:52.11

Chelsea Oda United States DNF

Marquita Palmer United States DNF

Kendra Pomfret Canada DNF

Hannah Kiser United States DNF

Mile OD

Work (at) Play Men Olympic Development 1500 Meters

1 Kyle Grieve 93 Canada 3:53.10

2 Christian Gravel 94 Canada 3:53.40

3 Theo Hunt 88 Canada 3:53.70

4 Cody Therrien 92 Canada 3:53.82

5 Jose Roberto Herre 91 Mexico 3:54.24

6 Chris Voth Canada 3:55.75

7 Patrick Psotka 93 Canada 3:56.18

8 Trey Simons Bermuda 3:56.87

9 Nathan Wadhwani 96 Canada 3:57.75

10 Jesse Hooton Canada 4:02.98

Joel De Schiffart Canada DNF

Victor Hugo Bracam 87 Mexico DNF

James Young Canada DNF

Thomas Getty Canada DNF

Three world leading marks for Harry Jerome Track Classic

The Jerome Track Classic is has been completed for 2014 and there were some interesting statistics for the 300 competitors from 23 countries.

Sarah Brown and Kate Van Buskirk produce #1 and #2 world leading marks in the mile  photo by Jeff Bell

Sarah Brown and Kate Van Buskirk produce #1 and #2 world leading marks in the mile photo by Jeff Bell

Sarah Brown of the USA produced the world leading time in the mile with her 4:26.67.  In fact this race produced 5 times in the top ten on world list for this season.  Kate Van Buskirk of Canada bounced back from her distressing run in Victoria to get 4:28.08 for second place.

Rosa Flanagan of New Zealand leads world junior list in the mile  photo by Brian Cliff

Rosa Flanagan of New Zealand leads world junior list in the mile photo by Brian Cliff

The 31st edition of the Jerome Track Classic produced two world leading performance in the mile in the junior category.  Jack Stapleton of Australia ran 4:01.29 and Rosa Flanagan of New Zealand did 4:38.32 to top the world lists.  Both will run the World Junior Championships in Eugene, Oregon in 2 weeks.

Eliza McCartney of New Zealand set new national record with 4:40m in pole vault  photo by Jeff Bell

Eliza McCartney of New Zealand set new national record with 4:40m in pole vault photo by Jeff Bell

Elizabeth McCartney of New Zealand broke the national junior record as she won the pole vault competition with a jump of 4.40m.

Eliza McCartney  celebrates new national record    photo by Jeff Bell

Eliza McCartney celebrates new national record photo by Jeff Bell

In total 49 athletes produced their personal best performances while 69 track a field performers got their seasonal bests.

Jeneba Tarmoh celebrates her new meet record

Jeneba Tarmoh celebrates her new meet record

The Jerome meet record in the 100m was set by Jeneba Tarmoh of the USA with her time of 11.21. She broke the 11.27 mark of Olympic medalist, Cathy Freeman of Australia set at Swangard stadium in 1996.

Nate Brannen targets fellow Canadian Charles Philibert-Thibou on his way to a victory in the men's mile run. Both managed to run sub-four minute mile times.  photo by Jeff Bell

Nate Brannen targets fellow Canadian Charles Philibert-Thibou on his way to a victory in the men’s mile run. Both managed to run sub-four minute mile times. photo by Jeff Bell

The 60th Anniversary Miracle Mile was won by Nate Brannen with Charles Philibert-Thiboutot close behind to give Canada a one, two finish  with 3:57.48 and 3:57.85 breaking the historic times set by Roger Bannister and John Landy in 1954 at the British Empire and Commonwealth Games in Vancouver.

Canada's Melissa Bishop wins the women's 800m  photo by Jeff Bell

Canada’s Melissa Bishop wins the women’s 800m
photo by Jeff Bell

Canada’s Melissa Bishop almost broke the 2 minute barrier as she won the 800m in 2:00.06

Once the National Track League compiled the division of prize pool, it was determined that the athletes at the Vancouver Sun Harry Jerome Track Classic received a total of $68,900.  This would be the highest total for prize support to the international field competing at the Burnaby tradition.

It is expected that the 2015 Jerome Track Classic will be held in early June to blend with the National Championships scheduled in Edmonton and the Pan American Games set for Toronto in July.

2014 Vancouver Sun Harry Jerome Track Classic Illustrated Results

Results 2014 Harry Jerome Track Classic

Photos by Brian Cliff

Men’s Invitational Events

 100 inv

Vancouver Sun 100m Men

1 Jason Rogers ST Kitts 10.30 -0.7

2 Mark Jelks 84 Nigeria 10.34 -0.7

3 Gavin Smellie 86 Canada 10.40 -0.7

4 Dontae Richards-Kwok 89 Canada 10.48 -0.7

5 Monzavous Edwards 81 Nigeria 10.49 -0.7

6 Mickey Grimes 76 United States 10.73 -0.7

– Aaron Brown 92 Canada DQ -false start

 400m INV m

Northern Gateway 400m Men

1 Latoy Williams 88 Bahamas 45.22

2 Josh Mance 92 United States 45.37

3 Daundre Barnaby 90 Canada 45.55

4 Akeem Gauntlett 09 Jamaica 45.57

5 Michael Robertson 89 Canada 46.81

6 Phillip Osei 90 Canada 47.62

7 Joshua Robinson 96 Australia 47.83

8 Nathan George 94 Canada 49.02

 800m INV m

Province of BC 800m Men

1 Anthony Romaniw Canada 1:46.80

2 Thomas Riva 92 Canada 1:47.76

3 Daniel Block 91 Canada 1:47.93

4 Saquille Dill 93 Bermuda 1:48.09

5 Luke Matthews 95 Australia 1:48.34

6 Felix Kitur 87 Kenya 1:50.11

7 Matt Maldonado 90 United States 1:50.28

– Tyler (Pace) Smit 94 Canada DNF

– Alex Ullman 92 Canada DNF

– Geoff Harris 87 Canada DNF

 Miracle Mile jerome men

Northern Gateway Mile Men

1 Nate Brannen 82 Canada 3:57.48

2 Charles Philibert- 90 Canada 3:57.85

3 Chris Derrick 90 United States 3:59.52

4 Colby Alexander 91 United States 3:59.69

5 Eric Avila United States 4:00.43

6 AJ Acosta 88 United States 4:00.47

7 Dan Gorman 88 Canada 4:00.96

8 Jack Stapleton 96 Australia 4:01.29

9 Luc Bruchet 91 Canada 4:02.34

10 Nick Falk 91 Canada 4:03.27

11 Justin Kent 92 Canada 4:03.32

12 Jose Juan Esparza 90 Mexico 4:05.93

13 Keffri Neal 93 Canada 4:11.22

– Matt (Pace) Schere United States DNF

– Adam Paul Morris (Pace) Canada DNF

Rob Guy congratulates Dylan armstrong   photo by Brian Cliff

Rob Guy congratulates Dylan Armstrong after World Championship bronze medal presentation   photo by Brian Cliff

Schein Foundation 400m Hurdles Men

1 Jeshua Anderson 89 United States 49.98

2 Chieh Chen 92 Chinese Taipei 50.63

3 Alie Beauvais Haiti 51.11

4 Bryce Collins 96 Australia 53.00

Diane Cummins retires after 18 year career and ten national titles in 800m

Diane Cummins retires after 18 year career and ten national titles in 800m

Team 1040 High Jump Men

1 Mike Mason 86 Canada 2.25m

2 Dontae Nall 99 United States 2.20m

3 Jesse Williams 83 Unattached J2.20m

4 Joel Baden 96 Australia 2.15m

5 Django Lovett Canada J2.15m

6 Cedric Dubler 95 Australia 2.05m

7 David Thomson 95 Australia 1.95m

– Darius Purcell 90 United States NH

Tim Nedow

Tim Nedow

B C Athletics Shot Put Men

1 Tim Nedow 90 Canada 20.45m

2 Jordan Clarke 90 United States 20.20m

3 Justin Rodhe 84 Canada 19.44m

4 Ming-Huang Chang 82 Chinese Taipei 19.40m

5 Amin Nikfar 81 Islamic Rep OF Iran 18.92m

TELUS supports the Jerome Outreach Society's work with youth and sport

TELUS supports the Jerome Outreach Society’s work with youth and sport

CTV Javelin Men

1 Sean Furey 82 United States 78.35m

2 Riley Dolezal 85 United States 78.13m

3 Cyrus Hostetler 86 United States 77.90m

4 Craig Kinsley United States 75.31m

5 Caleb Jones 91 Canada 74.29m

6 Kyle Nielsen 89 Canada 73.02m

7 Rhys Stein 96 Australia 65.66m

Vancouver Sun 4x100m relay Men

1 Hong Kong ‘A’ 39.69

1) Chi HO Tsui 2) KA Fung NG

3) Chun Hong SO 4) Yik Chun Tsang

2 Ocean Athletics Can ‘A’ 42.77

1) Matthew McLean 2) Jake Hanna

3) Michael Aono 4) Elias Elison

– Australia ‘A’ DQ Rule 170.6A passed b

1) Jacob Despard 96 2) Anthony Collum 95

3) Ryan Bedford 95 4) Jessie Usoalii 96

Women’s Invitational Events

100m inv

Vancouver Sun 100m Womenw (-1.3)

1 Jeneba Tarmoh 89 United States 11.21

2 Crystal Emmanuel 91 Canada 11.58

3 Octavious Freeman 92 United States 11.71

4 Ada Udaya 92 Liberia 11.73

5 Shai Anne Davis 93 Canada 11.81

6 Keyanna Wilson 88 United States 11.85

7 Kim Hyacinthe 89 Canada 11.96

8 Hannah Basic Australia 12.24

400m INV

Northern Gateway 400m  Women

1 Briana Nelson 92 United States 52.19

2 Audrey Jean-Baptis 91 Canada 53.21

3 Samantha Lind 96 Australia 54.25

4 Emily Lawson 96 Australia 55.81

5 Ella Solin 95 Australia 55.94

bishop 800m Jerome

Province of BC 800m Women

1 Melissa Bishop 88 Canada 2:00.06

2 Jessica Smith 89 Canada 2:02.08

3 Erica Moore 88 United States 2:02.14

4 Diane Cummins 74 Canada 2:02.15

5 Christina Rodgers 88 United States 2:02.39

6 Jenna Westaway 94 Canada 2:02.50

7 Helen Crofts 90 Canada 2:02.62

8 Georgia Wassall 96 Australia 2:02.68

– Rachel Francois 92 Canada DNF

– Lega Velve 90 Liberia (Pace) DNF

Mile w inv

Northern Gateway 1 Mile Women

1 Sarah Brown 86 United States 4:26.67

2 Kate Van Buskirk 87 Canada 4:28.08

3 Lauren Paquette 86 United States 4:30.73

4 Jessica O’Connell 89 Canada 4:30.75

5 Angela Bizzarri 88 United States 4:32.57

6 Shelby Houlihan 93 United States 4:33.52

7 Jessica Tebo 88 United States 4:35.61

8 Carise Thompson Canada 4:40.33

9 Rachel Cliff Canada 4:43.60

10 Stephanie Aldea Canada 4:46.06

11 Kerri Gallagher 89 United States 4:46.59

12 Laura Carlyle United States 4:53.36

– Melissa (Pace) Sa 86 United States DNF

– Anne Kesselring 89 Germany DNF

100m Hurdles

Government of BC 100m Hurdles Women (-0.7)

1 Jessica Zelinka 81 Canada 13.16

2 Angela Whyte 80 Canada 13.31

3 Phylicia George 87 Canada 13.49

4 Nichole Denby Nigeria 13.70

5 Michelle Young 92 Canada 13.77

6 Kierre Beckles 90 Barbados 14.04

7 Nikkita Holder 87 Canada 14.09

8 Katrina Hunt 96 Australia 14.18

close finish for 2nd and 3rd in 800m Invitational

close finish for 2nd and 3rd in 800m Invitational

CTV Pole Vault Women

1 Eliza McCartney 96 New Zealand 4.40m

2 Nina Kennedy 97 Australia 4.30m

3 Medinda Owen Withrow 84 United States 4.20m

4 Brysun Stately 86 United States 4.05m

4 Heather Hamilton 88 Canada 4.05m

4 Emma Phillipe 97 Australia 4.05m

– Vera Neuenswander 87 United States NH

CHMB 1320 High Jump Women

1 Cassie Purdon 96 Australia 1.84m

2 Emma Nuttall 92 Great Britain 1.81m

3 Nicola McDermott 96 Australia J1.81m

4 Emma Kimotto 91 Canada 1.75m

Resonance Branding Long Jump Women

1 Audrey Kyriacou 97 Australia 6.20m -1.1

2 Arantxa King 89 Bermuda 5.98m 0.6

3 Casidhe Simons 95 Australia 5.58m -0.2

Jav inv

Fairmont Pacific Rim Javelin Throw Women

1 Kara Patterson 86 United States 61.56m

2 Brittany Borman United States 59.94m

3 Liz Gleadle 88 Canada 58.70m

4 Krista Woodward 84 Canada 51.68m

5 Melissa Fraser 89 Canada 46.83m

6 Casidhe Simons 95 Australia 42.35m

7 Jessica Zelinka 81 Canada 40.16m

Men’s National Events

Linda Reimer, MLA Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Community, Sport and Cultural Development

Linda Reimer, MLA Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Community, Sport and Cultural Development

Peterson 100m Men (0.1)

1 James Linde 96 Canada 10.61

2 Jacob Despard 96 Australia 10.69

3 Jessie Usoalii 96 Australia 10.77

4 Keefer Joyce 94 Canada 10.78

5 Stephen Abosi Canada 10.80

6 Anthony Collum 95 Australia 10.86

7 Ryan Bedford 95 Australia 11.03

 

Foxtrot Wines 400m Men

1 Sam Reiser 93 Australia 47.15

2 Joel Lynch’90 Panama 47.65

3 James Kaluschke 95 Australia 47.78

4 Dan Forsyth 96 Australia 47.78

5 Jake Hannah 97 Canada 49.28

 800m Nat

Sheraton Vancouver Airport Hotel 800m Men

1 Jordan Makin 95 Australia 1:50.04

2 Cameron Procevait Canada 1:51.22

3 Cam Mitchell 90 Canada 1:51.90

4 Travis Vugteveen 92 Canada 1:53.51

5 Brendon Restall 94 Canada 1:56.69

– Nathan (Pace) Owen Unattached DNF

Mile Nat

TIMEX  Mile  Men

1 Craig Huffer Australia 4:02.16

2 Zak Patterson 95 Australia 4:02.49

3 Dan Quigley 89 United States 4:03.23

4 Aric Van Halen 89 United States 4:03.52

5 Jesus Arturo Espar Mexico 4:03.64

6 Ryan Brockerville 89 Canada 4:03.80

7 Morgan McDonald 96 Australia 4:04.01

8 Nigel Hole 89 Canada 4:04.05

9 Peter Corrigan 89 Canada 4:08.17

10 Karl Roberston 91 Canada 4:10.54

– Matt Miner 90 United States DNF

– Declan (Pace) Whit Canada DNF

Women’s National Events

100m NAT 

TELUS 100m Women (-0.9)

1 Joy Spear Chief Mo 94 Canada 11.92

2 Whitney Rowe 92 Canada 11.95

3 Larissa Chambers 95 Australia 12.09

4 Maddie Coates 97 Australia 12.09

5 Tavleen Singh 95 Australia 12.22

6 Brittany Burkitt 95 Australia 12.32

Farabloc 400m Women

1 Danni Alakija 96 Nigeria 56.17

2 Vanessa Sjoberg Canada 56.28

3 Courtney Geraghty 96 Australia 56.98

4 Rachel Shuttlewort Canada 58.37

800m shannon Nat

TEAM 1040 800m Women

1 Shannon Leinert 87 United States 2:03.13

2 Devan Wiebe 93 Canada 2:07.25

3 Amanda Banks Canada 2:07.89

4 Tamara Harris 93 Canada 2:10.31

5 Hilary Holt United States 2:10.44

6 Bethany Praska 89 United States 2:12.27

7 Marquita Palmer United States 2:12.55

8 Megan Malasarte 92 United States 2:14.60

– Vanessa (Pace) Sjo Canada DNF

Mile Nat women

TIMEX Mile Women

1 Rosa Flanagan New Zealand 4:38.32

2 Jessica Hull 96 Australia 4:41.67

3 Courtney Powell 95 Australia 4:43.18

4 Sarah Inglis 91 Great Britain 4:45.43

5 Anna Laman 95 Australia 4:49.18

6 Madeleine Sumner 98 Canada 4:53.61

7 Kate Spencer 95 Australia 4:55.71

8 Nicole Hutchinson 97 Canada 4:57.84

9 Stella Radford 95 Australia 4:58.35

10 Grace Thompson 97 Canada 4:58.50

11 Maddy MacDonald 94 Canada 5:07.45

12 Emma Balazs 95 Canada 5:09.03

13 Ally Ginther Canada 5:15.76

 

Men’s Olympic Development Events

 800m OD

Running Room 800m Men

1 Leoman Monah Nigeria 1:56.14

2 Reid Muller 97 Canada 1:56.25

3 Max Trummer Canada 1:56.33

4 Tim Delacourt Canada 1:56.91

5 Andrew Paul Morris Canada 1:57.91

6 Zachary Matyas Canada 2:00.87

– Michael ( Pace) Bu Canada DNF

Mile OD

WORK (at) PLAY Mile Men

1 Christian Gravel 94 Canada 4:09.05

2 Kyle Grieve 93 Canada 4:09.32

3 Cody Therrien 92 Canada 4:10.03

4 Theo Hunt 88 Canada 4:10.49

5 Jose Roberto Herre 91 Mexico 4:11.66

6 Patrick Psotka 93 Canada 4:12.38

7 Chris Voth Canada 4:12.39

8 Trey Simons Bermuda 4:14.91

9 Nathan Wadhwani 96 Canada 4:15.62

10 Jesse Hooton Canada 4:21.40

BC Sports Hall of Fame Long Jump Men

1 Dennis Nicholas 89 Canada 6.59m +0.0

Vancouver Sun 4x100m relay mixed age groups

1. Universal Athletics 14 yrs  girls 50.82

1) Katarina Vlahovic  2) Kiran Bangar 00

3) Laysha Tunti  4) Irene Nduikale 03

2. Ocean Athletics 12-13 yrs girls 54.30

1) Samantha Ogbeiwi 02 2) Angela Peters 02

3) Sarah Carins 02 4) Katie Deslauriers 02

3. South Fraser TC  11 years girls 55.93

1) Lana Sabet 03 2) Justine Colambot 03

3) Jasneet Nijjar 00 4) P S Basra 00

4. South Fraser TC 12-13yrs boys 56.60

1) Nicholas Aron 01 2) Jaheim Minot 01

3) Harshvir Lamba 01 4) Jesaiah Penson-McCoy 01

5. Royal City 12-13 yrs  girls59.44

1) Milena Kalisch 01 2) Annette Scott 01

3) Michelle Dadson 01 4) Amanda Scott 01

 

Women’s Olympic Development Events

Georgia Griffiths on right

Georgia Griffiths on right

TEAM 1040 800m Women

1 Georgia Griffith 96 Australia 2:04.91

2 Natalie Pichetti 86 Canada 2:09.28

3 Nicole Soderberg 92 Canada 2:09.48

4 Shauna McInnis 92 Canada 2:11.70

5 Michaela Kane Canada 2:12.07

6 Electra Charles 92 Canada 2:12.08

7 Sophie Dodd 96 Canada 2:20.44

– Tracie (Pace) Bos Canada DNF

4×100 Meter Relay Van Sun Mixed OD

1 Australia women 45.52

1) Hana Basic 96 2) Larissa Chambers 95

3) Brittany Burkitt 95 4) Katrina Hunt 96

2 Strathcona TC men 45.79

1) Tony Lin 97 2) Austin Keith 97

3) Felix Law 97 4) Drew Oller 97

3 International Team women 46.28

1) Joy Spear Chief Morris 94 2) Whitney Rowe 92

3) Maddie Coates 97 4) Tavleen Singh 95

Bishop Dominates Jerome Classic 800m

Melissa Bishop takes 800 at Jerome Classic, just misses 2 minute barrier

BY GARY KINGSTON, VANCOUVER SUN JULY 11, 2014 10:05 AM
Melissa Bishop takes 800 at Jerome Classic, just misses 2 minute barrier

Canada’s Melissa Bishop (purple top) takes the women’s 800 M in Harry Jerome Classic at Swangard Stadium Thursday, July 10, 2014.

Photograph by: Mark van Manen , PNG

METRO VANCOUVER – The four-minute mile, first accomplished 60 years ago, was celebrated Thursday night at Burnaby’s Swangard Stadium.

But there’s a more current barrier that is bedevilling some of Canada’s finest female 800-metre runners.

“Ugghhh!!! I know, it’s right there, eh,” said Canadian champion Melissa Bishop after running 2:00.06 to win the event at The Vancouver Sun Harry Jerome International Track Classic.

The Eganville, Ont., native is one of just four women in Canadian history to have gone under two minutes, with a personal best of 1:59.69. She wasn’t far off Thursday, two nights after coming within 1/100ths of a second at the Victoria Track Classic with a 1:59.70 finish.

“It does become (a mental thing) because you’re so focused on hitting your splits that — sometimes you just need to put it out of your head and friggin’ run,” said Bishop.

One of the other Canadians to break the two-minute mark is North Vancouver’s Jessica Smith. She has a personal best of 1:59.86, but was second Thursday in 2:02.08.

“There’s a reason not many girls are on that list,” said Smith. “It’s just one of those things.

“You’ve just to keep at it and that’s the internal struggle with this sport. The successes are few and far between. When you do find one, it keeps you in the sport and I’m sure Diane can attest to that.”

Diane Cummins is the Canadian record-holder at the distance (1:58.39, set in 2001). The 40-year-old who called Victoria home for several years is retiring at the end of this season and was fourth Thursday in 2:02.15.

Cummins has silver and bronze medals from the Commonwealth Games, but didn’t qualify for 2014. Both Bishop and Smith are headed to the Games in Glasgow later this month where they are expected to be medal contenders.

The best 800-metre time by a Commonwealth runner this year is a 1:58.48 from Kenya’s Eunice Jepkoech Sum.

Both Bishop and Smith are eagerly anticipating running in Glasgow.

“I feel like I’m in the best shape of my career,” said Smith, a refrain echoed by Bishop. “I’ve been having unbelievable workouts. Hopefully, there’s some PBs coming soon.”

Bishop said she was disappointed not to crack two minutes at the Jerome.

“Maybe I’m just saving it for the Commonwealth Games. That would be nice.”

The rarely run men’s mile was contested Thursday to mark 60 years since Roger Bannister and John Landy both broke four minutes at the 1954 British Empire Games in Vancouver.

But with the designated rabbit setting too slow a pace, it turned into a rather pedestrian affair, with 32-year-old Canadian Nate Brannen crossing the line first in 3:57.48.

“It was way too slow, no one wanted to go. They all just looked at me. Everyone knows my style, I’ll be there at the end and I’m going to kick hard. So if you’re going to beat me, you better go,” said Brannen, who won $6,000 but failed to get the $4,000 bonus for going under 3:56.00.

“That was the main goal,” said the Cambridge, Ont., athlete. “My wife is eight months pregnant. The 10 grand would have been nice. Worst case, go for the win, miss out on the (extra money).”

Brannen won the 1,500 metres at last month’s Canadian track and field championships in Moncton, but failed to meet the standard to race in Glasgow. In fact, no Canadian male will race the distance at the Games.

It was a tough night Thursday for some of the top Canadians.

The country’s newest sprint star, Aaron Brown of Toronto, false started in the men’s 100 metres and was disqualified. Earlier this year, Brown — who has a personal best of 10.05 in the 100 metres — broke Atlee Mahorn’s 23-year-old Canadian record in the 200. And a week ago, he beat a stacked field at that distance in Edmonton.

In the javelin, Canadian record-holder Liz Gleadle of Vancouver, a medal contender at the Commonwealth Games, was a disappointing third with a throw of 58.70 metres, nearly six metres off the record throw she unleashed in May in Lethbridge, Alta.

Gleadle said her mechanics have been off lately.

“I just haven’t been spending a lot of time with my coach (at her base in Lethbridge). I came back (to Vancouver) for a week to get physio and it’s just kind of all over the place.

“It’s frustrating because you can see the javelin just flies out of my hand, there’s so much power in the throw. And you think, ‘Man, if I just hit the angle properly it would just go 10 metres further.’ It’s frustrating to not be able to do it at Harry Jerome.”

Gleadle said she’s still confident that two solid weeks with her coach will have her ready to throw well in Glasgow.

“It’s just the angle of the throw. That’s it.”

gkingston@vancouversun.com

© Copyright (c) The Vancouver Sun

Read more:http://www.vancouversun.com/sports/Melissa+Bishop+takes+Jerome+Classic+just+misses+minute+barrier/10019392/story.html#ixzz37CE5OZ5L